My experience with Dahn Yoga

I had an interesting experience
this week. I walked into a health food store while visiting my sister in the
southwest Chicago suburbs. While purchasing my vitamins, there was an Asian guy
asking if we wanted our aura read. I was with my sister, her daughter and my
niece. We all decided to participate. You put your hands on the metal outline
of two hands and a body with the colors of your aura would appear on a computer
screen.

The reading revealed the colors of
your energy and indicated your brain and body energy. My energy was fairly
balanced and the colors indicated a degree of inner healing, however I did have
some stuck energy and areas of tension according the guy doing the reading. My
niece and sister had their’s done and the reading was accurate for their state
of stress and health at the moment. The young man gave us a brochure about his
healing venue called Dahn Yoga.

It turns out he had a class on
Saturday, so my niece and I decided to go. We soon learned that this was more
than your typical yoga class. The sign on the outside read Dahn Yoga, Brain
Respiration. Interesting! We walked in and were soon told that we both needed a
full healing and the Thanksgiving special offered 50% off so we decided this
would not only be an interesting experience, but also beneficial – if it was
valid.

My healing experience was with the
young man who was doing the aura reading at the health food store. This is not
my first experience with healing techniques. I have practiced traditional forms
of yoga for years. I also had my own classes. I have also participated in Tai
Ch
i and Qigong classes. I enjoy massage therapy and have also had acupuncture
several times. This reminded me of Shiatsu massage.

My niece and I had separate
experiences. Her healer was a young Korean woman. The private healing rooms
were furnished with a bamboo mat, soft pillow, and a burning candle. It was
very relaxing, with lights dimmed and the reminder to simply experience and
focus on the body sensations that came up.

As in all holistic healing
modalities I was reminded to focus on deep relaxing breaths. My healer spent a
lot of time massaging the abdominal area, tapping on the area just over the
heart, and tapping on the head. I let myself simply experience whatever came
up. I really felt very little until he stopped his movement and massage. Then I
felt a warmth and tingly sensation mostly in my upper body.

After the bodywork, we sat and
talked and he seemed very knowledgeable about energy balance as it relates to
the body, mind and spirit. We also discussed some  of my emotional stuck areas and I felt his insights were
very affirming and helpful.

My niece said her healer did more
massage of her back and feet, but overall her experience felt good and
positive.

I went in knowing nothing about
Dahn Yoga. We never took a class so I had no idea what a Dahn Yoga class would
be like. I left feeling I had gotten my money’s worth at half price and the
experience was overall a positive one.

            We
did enjoy the private healing and were not pressured to join, but they did
offer information and brochures on workshops and training.

            Since
returning home, I have done some on line research and found everything from
positive testimonials of healing to negative accusations of cult behavior and
lawsuits.

            Having
fallen into the trap of following “Gurus” in my past, I will count this as one
positive experience along the journey, and best leave it as over for now.

             Have you experienced Dahn Yoga or other
brain healing modalities?

What has been your experience?

 

 

 

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The Middle Way Means:

"The Middle Way is a Buddhist philosophy of balance. The Buddha learned he could not heal the world by leaving it. He learned to heal it by living in the world with compassion and detachment. My own experience has turned me from extremes to the realization that healing is in moderation and balance-not perfection."
- Mary Claybon

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